cerakoting

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Anyway, the finish employs ceramic (hence "cera") particles as part of the solution. This creates a hard surface that resists scratching and other abrasion, such as if the pistol is dropped or otherwise impacted by something. The purchaser can either get Cerakote guns from manufacturers - many of whom apply the finish at the factory - or apply it at home (or have a gunsmith do it) as an aftermarket upgrade. Manufacturers typically offer Cerakote finishes in some sort of tactical tan or green color, though many more finishes are available. Pick the finish you want; you can even use it to match your gun with other items. That way, you could have a car in British Racing Green and then Cerakote a car gun finished to match - which would be classy. The drawback is that most Cerakote finishes (Cerakote H is most common) require an oven cure rather than merely just air drying, which is all that many other gun finishes need. It isn't recommended to use one's kitchen oven to do the deed. Not that it won't work, but the fumes can linger and you really don't want them in your food. Granted, used ovens are relatively cheap, if one wanted to get one for one's workshop. You also have the burners to make lunch in the shop, if so desired. There are air-cured Cerakote finishes (the Cerakote C range) available, but they are more for high-temperature applications (such as barrels, rather than slides) and optics rather than other firearm surfaces, such as the frame.. Continue reading at: http://gunbelts.com/blog/cerakote/
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